The Tale of Hodja Nasreddin: Disturber of the Peace

Leonid Solovyov

translated by Michael Karpelson


Returning to Bukhara after a prolonged exile, Hodja Nasreddin finds his family gone, his home destroyed, and his city in the grasp of corrupt and greedy rulers who have brought pain and suffering upon the common folk. But Hodja Nasreddin is not one to bow to oppression or abandon the downtrodden. Though he is armed only with his quick wits and his donkey, all the swords, walls, and dungeons in the land cannot stop him!

Leaning on his own experiences and travels during the first half of the 20th century, Leonid Solovyov weaves the many stories and anecdotes about Hodja Nasreddin – a legendary folk character in the Middle East and Central Asia – into a masterful tale brimming with passionate love for life, liberty, and happiness.


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Print edition

ISBN: 978-0-9812695-0-4
Format: Trade paperback
Page count: 234
Trim size: 5 x 8
Price: $12.99 US
Publication date: 11.11.2009

eBook edition

ISBN: 978-0-9812695-1-1
Formats: eReader, ePub, Amazon Kindle
("buy" link below is for Kindle)

Price: $4.99 US
Publication date: 1.4.2010

Author biography


Leonid Vasilyevich Solovyov was born in 1906 in the city of Tripoli, Lebanon, where his parents had been working for the Imperial Orthodox Palestine Society. In 1909, the family returned to Russia; in 1921, it moved to Kokand, Uzbekistan. Solovyov worked for several regional newspapers and, during his travels in Uzbekistan's Fergana Province, studied regional folklore.

In 1930, Solovyov left for Moscow and enrolled in the literary and screenwriting program at the Institute of Cinematography, graduating in 1932. While living in Moscow, Solovyov wrote a number of novels, short stories, and screenplays. Disturber of the Peace – the first part of Solovyov's best known work, The Tale of Hodja Nasreddin – was published in 1939. During the Second World War, Solovyov served as a war correspondent and produced several wartime stories and screenplays.

In 1946, Solovyov was accused of conspiring to commit acts of terrorism against the Soviet state. He was interred in several prison camps until 1954, when he was cleared of all charges and released. The second part of The Tale of Hodja Nasreddin, subtitled The Enchanted Prince, was written in the camps and completed around 1950. After his imprisonment, Solovyov settled in Leningrad. The two parts of The Tale of Hodja Nasreddin were published together for the first time in 1956 and enjoyed a very favorable reception. However, the author's health began to decline, and he passed away in 1962.

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The Fatal Eggs

Mikhail Bulgakov

translated by Michael Karpelson


As the turbulent years following the Russian revolution of 1917 settle down into a new Soviet reality, the brilliant and eccentric zoologist Persikov discovers an amazing ray that drastically increases the size and reproductive rate of living organisms. At the same time, a mysterious plague wipes out all the chickens in the Soviet republics. The government expropriates Persikov's untested invention in order to rebuild the poultry industry, but a horrible mixup quickly leads to a disaster that could threaten the entire world.

This H. G. Wells-inspired novel by the legendary Mikhail Bulgakov is the only one of the his longer works to have been published in its entirety during the author's lifetime. A poignant work of social science fiction and a brilliant satire on the Soviet revolution, it can now be enjoyed by English-speaking audiences through this accurate new translation.

Includes annotations and commentary.


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Print edition

ISBN: 978-0-9812695-2-8
Format: Trade paperback
Page count: 110
Trim size: 5 x 8
Price: $9.99 US
Publication date: 4.1.2010

eBook edition

ISBN: 978-0-9812695-3-5
Formats: eReader, ePub, Amazon Kindle
("buy" link below is for Kindle)

Price: $3.99 US
Publication date: 4.1.2010

Author biography


Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov was born in 1891 in Kiev, the eldest son of a professor at a theological seminary. After graduating from the medical school at Kiev University in 1916, Bulgakov served as a field doctor in the Russian civil war and was eventually transferred to the Caucasus, where he made the decision to pursue a literary career. His brothers enlisted as well, but ended up in Paris, while Mikhail remained in Russia. He began writing around 1916; by 1924, he had completed his first major novel, The White Guard.

The Fatal Eggs was first published in 1925 in the journal Nedra. Bulgakov faced extensive censorship and criticism for his allegedly anti-Soviet views, and many of his works remained unpublished until long after his death. The Fatal Eggs, an early short novel, is the only one of Bulgakov's better known works that was published in its entirety during the author's lifetime. During his life, Bulgakov was best known for his plays, such as Days of the Turbins, based on The White Guard and rumored to be particularly favored by Joseph Stalin. However, relentless hounding by Soviet critics effectively stifled his writing career by the late 1920s.

In 1930, with all of his plays banned and no theater willing to employ him, Bulgakov wrote to the Soviet government asking for permission to emigrate. Stalin telephoned Bulgakov personally and denied his request, appointing Bulgakov to a position at the Moscow Art Theater instead. During the last decade of his life, Bulgakov continued to work on plays, stage adaptations, and short stories, as well as his best known and final novel, The Master and Margarita.

Bulgakov died from inherited nephrosclerosis in 1940, leaving the editing of The Master and Margarita unfinished. Today, Bulgakov is considered one of the most important Russian literary figures of the 20th century.

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